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Taylor Swift lands role in spy movie

Taylor Swift lands role in spy movie

Photo: WENN/Dennis Van Tine/Future Image

Taylor Swift is set to show off her martial arts skills onscreen after reportedly landing a role opposite Samuel L. Jackson in Matthew Vaughn’s new spy film The Secret Service.

The Pulp Fiction icon will portray the movie’s villain, who kidnaps Swift’s character, only for her to escape and exact revenge, according to Britain’s The Mirror.

A source tells the newspaper, “She will be required to have some heavy-duty martial arts training in order that her character convincingly kicks Samuel L. Jackson’s butt.”

The Secret Service, based on Dave Gibbons and Mark Millar’s graphic novel of the same name, will also feature Colin Firth and Sir Michael Caine, while soccer superstar David Beckham was recently linked to a cameo appearance too.

Production is set to begin in London and the south of France later this year, ahead of a November, 2014 release.

Swift has already started building up her acting resume – she’s previously starred on hit TV shows New Girl and CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, as well as ensemble romantic comedy Valentine’s Day.

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