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More than 100 sites to ring bells for MLK speech

More than 100 sites to ring bells for MLK speech

Charles Steele, president emeritus & CEO of Southern Christian Leadership Council, speaks at the Let Freedom Ring ceremony at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. It was 50 years ago today when Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech from the steps of the memorial. The bell at rear rang at the 16th St Baptist Church in Birmingham, Ala. which was bombed 18 days after the March On Washington killing four young girls. Photo: Associated Press/Carolyn Kaster

WASHINGTON (AP) — The final refrain of Martin Luther King Jr.’s most famous speech will echo around the world as bells from churches, schools and historical monuments “let freedom ring” in celebration of a powerful moment in civil rights history.

Most of the commemorations will happen Wednesday at 3 p.m. locally or to coincide with 3 p.m. eastern time, the hour when King delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech in Washington 50 years ago.

Quoting from the patriotic song, “My Country ’tis of Thee,” King implored his audience to “let freedom ring” from the “hilltops” and “mountains” of every state, some of which he mentioned as examples in his speech.

On Wednesday, bells will ring from each of those particular sites, and beyond.

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