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Thom Yorke and Moby clash over online music streaming

Thom Yorke and Moby clash over online music streaming

ONLINE MUSIC: Thom Yorke (above) disagrees with Moby about online music streaming. Photo: Associated Press

Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke has become embroiled in an online dispute with Moby after the dance star criticized the singer for failing to embrace online music streaming service Spotify.

Yorke hit headlines earlier this year when he decided to remove music by his side project, Atoms For Peace, from the web platform following a dispute over artist royalty rates, and he subsequently accused the company of changing the music industry for the worse.

His comments have riled fellow musician Moby, who is a supporter of Spotify, and he criticized Yorke in an interview with Mashable.com, saying, “Artists who are adaptable are doing fine… If you can learn how to adapt – it’s really weird and unhealthy when people talk about restricting progress to accommodate the inability of people to adapt. Every industry has been impacted by (changes in technology) in both negative and positive ways, but I feel like to complain is pointless. I love Thom Yorke, but when I heard him complaining about Spotify, I’m like, ‘You’re just like an old guy yelling at fast trains’. I love anything that enables people to have more music in their lives.”

Yorke has since posted a link to Moby’s comments on his Twitter.com page, writing, “I am a 45 yr (sic) old Luddite and proud of it… yawn.”

Moby responded by declaring his respect for the Radiohead singer and David Byrne, another outspoken critic of Spotify, but he also insisted the stars need to embrace the digital music age.

In a post on Twitter, he writes, “To be clear, I love Thom Yorke and David Byrne, creative geniuses. I just don’t see the point in fighting a future that’s already here.”

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