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Michelle Wie wins U.S. Women’s Open

Michelle Wie wins U.S. Women’s Open

WINNER:Michelle Wie watches her tee shot on the second hole during the final round of the U.S. Women's Open golf tournament in Pinehurst, N.C., Sunday, June 22. Photo: Associated Press/Chuck Burton

PINEHURST, N.C. (AP) — Michelle Wie finally delivered a performance worthy of the attention heaped on her since she was a teenager.

Wie bounced back from a late mistake at Pinehurst No. 2 to bury a 25-foot birdie putt on the 17th hole. That sent the 24-year-old from Hawaii to her first major championship Sunday in the U.S. Women’s Open.

She closed with an even-par 70 for a two-shot victory over Stacy Lewis, the No. 1 player in the women’s golf who made Wie work for it by making eight birdies in a round of 66.

Wie has been one of the biggest names in women’s golf since she was 13 and played in the final group of a major. She now has four LPGA victories and leads the tour’s money list.

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