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Jared Leto’s Oscar is a ‘filthy mess’

Jared Leto’s Oscar is a ‘filthy mess’

THE OSCAR:Jared Leto poses in the press room with the award for best actor in a supporting role for "Dallas Buyers Club" during the Oscars at the Dolby Theatre on Sunday, March 2, in Los Angeles. Photo: Associated Press/ Jordan Strauss/Invision

RYAN PEARSON, AP Entertainment Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jared Leto says that although his Oscar has led to new opportunities in Hollywood, he isn’t overly concerned with the trophy itself.

The 42-year-old actor-musician took home the gold-plated statuette last month for his supporting role as transgender drug addict Rayon in “Dallas Buyers Club.” It has sustained a few scrapes since then after circulating among friends.

Leto says his Oscar is “a filthy mess. Everybody was pawing that thing.”

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He is now promoting “Artifact,” a documentary he directed about the battle that his band, 30 Seconds to Mars, had with its record label over its contract and a $30 million lawsuit. The film, available on iTunes, airs Saturday on VH1 and Palladia.

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